An Outdoorsy Book List

Well, National Great Outdoors Month is over. I spent my free time last month outdoors (where else) and reading (trying to find spare moments).

I’ve decided that maybe the entire summer should be devoted to celebrating the wonders of the great outdoors. Here, then, are my favorite outdoorsy books:

John Krakauer, Gretel Ehrlich, Into Thin Air, Into the Wild, The Solace of Open Spaces

Into Thin Air by Jon Krakauer

The Solace of Open Spaces by Gretel Ehrlich

Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer

My Side of the Mountain by Jean Craighead George and Hatchet buy Gary Paulson

My Side of the Mountain by Jean Craighead George

Hatchet by Gary Paulsen

They run the gamut from young adult to adult, fiction to nonfiction. I hope you enjoy them!

Have you read any of these books? What did you think? Do you have book recs about or featuring the great outdoors?

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Weekly Reads | 7.28.2014

With Claire visiting my parents last week, Nick and I got to work on some household projects. I didn’t have much reading time, but I took as much time as possible.

Beginning this week, I’ll be reading the second half of

Zenith City: Stories from Duluth by Michael FedoZenith City: Stories from Duluth
By Michael Fedo

On my commute I’ve been switching between the radio and

The Magician's Assistant by Ann PatchettThe Magician’s Assistant (Audiobook)
By Ann Patchett

I wasn’t sure I’d stick with this after the first few minutes, but, as usual, I’m glad I stuck with it.

If you’re interested in my thoughts as I read, check out my new Tumblr Totally Contains Spoilers.

Recent Posts

July Book Lists

Pick out your next read from these great lists.

A Review of Steve Martin’s An Object of Beauty

Not comedy, but Martin’s distinctive voice shines through.

What are you reading this week?

**Linked up with Book Journey**

Weekly Reads: 6.16.14 & Twitterature 6.2014

As I begin the week, I’m finishing How to Read Literature Like a Professor by Thomas C. Foster. I’m going to be packing and cleaning like mad for the next two nights, so I’ll probably still be reading it when we jump in the car on Wednesday morning. Joining me on the road trip are

The Best Creative Nonfiction, Vol. 2 Edited by Lee Gutkind

The Best Creative Nonfiction, Vol. 2
Edited by Lee Gutkind

Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg

Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead 
By Sheryl Sandberg

Twin Cities Noir

Twin Cities Noir

and….

an as yet undetermined piece of fiction. Suggestions? I’m looking for something middle of the road between light and fluffy and dense and confusing.

Twitterature

It’s been a couple months, but I’m happy to return to sharing brief reviews of recent reads.

Loving Frank by Nancy Horan

Loving Frank
By Nancy Horan

Complicated, fascinating and so much more. The love affair of Frank Lloyd Wright and Mamah Borthwick reflects the architects own work and relationship with his peers.

The Gondola Maker by Laura Morelli

The Gondola Maker
By Laura Morelli

Morelli’s debut is a well-crafted story. See what I did there? It’s a gondola making pun!

People of the Book By Geraldine Brooks

People of the Book
By Geraldine Brooks

As always, Brooks has woven together a web of richly detailed and fascinating stories into one must-read novel.

What are you reading this week?

**Linked up with Book Journey**

**Linked up with Modern Mrs. Darcy’s Twitterature**

Weekly Reads: 4.21.14

March is supposed to come in like a lion weather wise, but I’ve been so busy this month, that I’ve decided the statement applies to my calendar and to do list for the beginning of April as well.

During my lunch break, which I haven’t officially taken for two weeks, I‘m reading

The B2B Social Media Book: Becoming a Marketing Superstar | Weekly Reads at The 1000th Voice blog

The B2B Social Media Book
By Kipp Bodnar & Jeffrey L. Cohen

This book has a lot of great insights for the BSB social media market that I am.

I finished Steve Martin’s An Object of Beauty over the weekend. I absolutely loved it. It was so weird, but so great. I picked up

People of the Book
By Geraldine Brooks

What are you reading this week?

**Linked up with Book Journey**

Weekly Reads: 3.31.14

I think I finished about a book and a half in March. A little slow, but I enjoyed what I was reading.

Last week I started two books. During my lunch break I‘m reading

The B2B Social Media Book: Becoming a Marketing Superstar | Weekly Reads at The 1000th Voice blog

The B2B Social Media Book
By Kipp Bodnar & Jeffrey L. Cohen

At home, I’m reading

A Object of Beauty By Steve Martin | Weekly Reads at The 1000th Voice blog

An Object of Beauty
By Steve Martin

What are you reading this week?

**Linked up with Book Journey**

Creativity, Creativity & Creativity: A Review of The Creative Habit by Twyla Tharp

At the beginning of January I decided to choose two words to help guide my year. Why two? Mostly because I couldn’t decide on just one. But since January, I hadn’t really thought much about either word. Until I started reading

The Creative Habit by Twyla Tharp | Book Review by The 1000th Voice

The Creative Habit: Learn It and Use it For Life
By Twyla Tharp

What are my words? Creativity and Intentional. Creativity is something I need (and well pretty much everyone needs) in their professional and personal lives. By continuing to hone my creativity, I’ll reap great rewards in my personal and professional lives. Intentional is a bit more abstract. I just want to take more time to focus on being intentional with my actions.

Review

Creativity as a habit is a foreign concept to the common portrayal of creatives in TV shows, movies and more. Generally we see a creative person who’s wild and unpredictable. But Tharp presents a different view, one in which the creative person is driven by habit, following an established daily routine and approaching projects in a similar way. This approach was new to me. I’ve often thought that I need to set up a daily routine, so that I can squeeze in time to write and pursue other creative endeavors. I’ve never considered that it would help make me more creative.

No one starts a creative endeavor without a certain amount of fear; the key is to learn how to keep free-floating fears from paralyzing you before you’ve begun. (page 22)

Throughout the book, Tharp presents a lot of great ways to help maximize creativity. For example, to get out of a creative rut, Tharp recommends challenging assumptions by identifying the concept that isn’t working, write down your assumptions about it, challenge those assumptions and act on the challenge.

When creativity has become your habit; when you’ve learned to manage time, resources, expectations, and the demands of others; when you understand the value and place of validation, continuity and purity of purpose–then you’re on the way to an artist’s ultimate goal: the achievement of mastery. (page 240)

Rating

Writing 4 out of 5 stars

Tharp’s writing was strong.

Storytelling 5 out of 5 stars

Tharp doesn’t just tell people how to be creative. She shows them by sharing stories about her own creative pursuits–the ups and the downs, successes and failures.

Cultural Impact 4 out of 5 stars

Tharp’s book is commonly mentioned when talking about creatives doing their thing. There’s a reason for that. She has a long history of successful creative pursuits.

TOTAL 4.33 out of 5 stars

Have you read Tharp’s book? What did you think? What’s your favorite book about creativity?